How to Delete 200,000 Emails from Gmail

How to Delete 200,000 Emails from Gmail

Are you looking to clean your Gmail inbox? Are most websites not helping you? Fear not! There is a simple and quick solution. I’ve detailed it here for you below: 1. Open your Internet Browser (Google Chrome), head to Gmail, and sign into your account. 2. Next visit the Show search options arrow up top in the search bar, click Create a filter.   3. In the “Has the words” text field, type before:2015/01/01 or your preferred date. That is an example date; the goal here is to delete all messages received prior to January 1 of last year. You can use any date you want, as long as it conforms to the format YYYY/MM/DD. 4. Click the blue Search Mail Button or blue Create Filter with this Search Text Hyperlink   5. Then make sure your screen looks like this:     6. Check the box that has a small arrow next to it, it should mark approx 50 conversations below. You can now see in the dead center of the page a tiny hyperlink for Select All Conversations That Match This Search. (Tip: If you want to preserve your email while still getting it out of your inbox, choose to skip the inbox (Archive it) instead.) You can click that option: “Select All Conversations That Match This Search“   7. Click the Trash Can Button to Delete your Emails!  Depending on how many messages meet the filter criteria, the deletion process may take a minute or longer. If it crashes please repeat this process with a different date filter that might lessen the amount you delete at one time Just make sure you really want to permanently delete all that email....
Top 20 Coding Bootcamps

Top 20 Coding Bootcamps

Today it is hard to find a recent college graduate who has not taken additional coursework outside of their college workload. With the increase in the demand for more tech-savvy employees,  students have flocked to alternative forms of learning online and offline. These alternative forms of learning range from coding boot camps to websites like Lynda.com. Meanwhile, the world of online and offline learning is experiencing a large shift. New startups have been tackling the increased demand for alternative education platforms. One of the most progressive companies in alternative online technology education is One Month, founded by Mattan Griffel. One Month allows students to learn online at their own pace, but it also gives them the opportunity to do project-based learning. This setup allows the students to build a project while they study, which helps to enhance their retention of material learned from classes. Another company that wants to teach young people coding skills is targeting the high school market. HackEDU allows high school students to build their own coding clubs. HackEDU provides new clubs with a baseline coding curriculum, free software tools, and community building training. Online education and school tech-clubs are the beginning of alternative education in the Web 2.0 age. Coding boot camps collectively make up one of the fastest growing education programs in the United States. The coding boot camp market will grow by 2.4 times, to an estimated 16,056 graduates in 2015, up from 6,740 in 2014. For comparison, estimates suggest that there were 48,700 undergraduate computer science graduates from accredited US universities in 2014. Below is a comprehensive list of the top 20 coding boot...
Top 20 Startup CoWorking Spaces

Top 20 Startup CoWorking Spaces

We are in the age of the coworking space; a replacement to the traditional office environment. The main reason for this change is the overwhelming need to increase creativity in the workspace. The modern entrepreneur seeks opportunities to grow his network and work in a vast collaborative environment. Many of these ideas can be found in modern technology firms like Google or Facebook. Another common feature of coworking spaces is that they are often involved with throwing exciting events. These events range from book launches to hackathons. This year the buzz is all about the Fueled Collective coworking space, which is located by the corner of Prince Street and Broadway in bustling downtown New York City. Fueled (as they are colloquially known) boasts an eccentric and hip co-working space with numerous technology companies located on its premises. This swanky coworking space boasts one of the best startup networking scenes. It has access to some of the top venture-capital firms around. They offer free gourmet coffee and ice cream to residents of the collective. Fueled even has direct access to neighboring companies such as Foursquare and Thrillist, amongst others. Another impressive coworking space is AlleyNYC. Alley caters to the hackers, hustlers, and hipsters of NYC. It provides access to an incredible location on 7th avenue in the Chelsea neighborhood. It has a massive 16,000 square foot entrepreneurial hub, where teams and individuals can grow their businesses. (I participated in the PayPal hackathon that was held in the space for nearly 24 hours. I came out of the event exceedingly happy; the prizes were amazing, the food was unreal and the competition was fierce.) Here is...